My Basket (0)

follow us on facebook
follow us on twitter
follow us on twitter

Graphic Impact

Graphic Impact: Our Lives in Print was a two year project funded by the William Grant Foundation, which began in April 2018. The project was managed and delivered by Sarah Stewart, Education Officer and Kerry Patterson, Archive Curator.

The key aims of the project were to learn about the early days of the organisation by interviewing founding members and staff, to highlight the role of women who  contributed to the growth of the organisation in a variety of ways, and to enable people to engage with the collection in a new way.

Graphic Impact

Using the Archive through exhibitions, events and engagement work prior to 2018, a gap in the information we held became apparent - our records included little material recording the early days of GPS (c. 1972-1989). Of the eight members who founded the organisation in 1972, 50% were women: Beth Fisher, Sheena McGregor, Eileen Ormiston and Jacki Parry.

Throughout the project, fifteen people were interviewed including founding members, board members and early staff members. These have been recorded and fully transcribed, with six older interviews also transcribed by volunteers.We, now know their contributions included physically labouring to kit out the workshop, applying for funding, running the workshop for members, providing education classes and editioning prints.

Graphic Impact

Common themes started to appear from information gathered through these interviews and have informed the digital resource which we continued to develop throughout 2020/21 during the Covid19 pandemic & consequent Lockdowns.

We are delighted to announce the launch of Graphic Impact: Our Lives in Print which presents the important oral history information gathered throughout the project, providing a fascinating insight into the attitudes, enthusiasm and character of the people involved at the time, specifically during the period between 1972-89.

Graphic Impact

In addition, we can announce that funding secured from The William Grant Foundation’s Scottish Heritage & Culture Fund for a further 3 years will enable us to develop and extend the oral history research up to present day, upgrade and digitally futureproof the Archive, and build staff capacity.

“I am delighted at the substantial contribution awarded by the William Grant Foundation which will enable us to continue researching & developing the Archive, enabling it to play a central part in a range of exhibitions, community & engagement activities planned around our 50thAnniversary in 2022.” 

Sarah Stewart Education Officer

Graphic Impact

“Working with the contributors to the oral history resource was a wonderful experience, and I very much appreciate everyone who gave up their time to speak to me. The information they shared is so important to include in the history of the organisation and gives a unique insight into the story of Glasgow Print Studio”

Kerry Patterson

 

To find out more and learn about the project, please visit www.graphic-impact.co.uk


Images (from top): Graphic Impact 'Timeline' graphic from web page. Print Studio founding members (L-R) John Faulds, Eileen Ormiston and Bill Blacker with fellow student Leonard Gray in the Glasgow School of Art Printmaking Department c.1971/1972. (Photograph courtesy of, and © of Bob Murray). John Taylor screenprinting with John MacKechnie and Clive Sutton, around 1977. (Photo © Glasgow Print Studio, ref. GLAPS.2012.55). Douglas Thomson exhibition 'Prints and Paintings' in the Glasgow Print Studio Gallery in Ingram Street, March 1985. (Photo © Glasgow Print Studio, ref. GLAPS.2011.497.5.). Elizabeth Blackadder working with Master Printmaker Stuart Duffin, 1987 (Photo © Glasgow Print Studio, ref. GLAPS.2011.502.6.). John Mackechnie in the Ingram Street Workshop in the early 1980s (Photo © Glasgow Print Studio, Ref GLAPS.2012.185). Elspeth Roberts in the lithography area at Ingram Street, early 1980s (Photo © Glasgow Print Studio, ref. GLAPS.2012.167).


Featured artists and printmaking courses